Workforce Re-entry: the end of the search is just the beginning

by Susan Silverman

It has been two months since my family returned from our three year European adventure. I knew the hardest thing about returning to the United States was finding a job…in my field, at the level I left, and at the salary that I was making previously. As I wrote in January, the research data shows that it is almost impossible to return to the working world at the seniority, professional level, and salary you were getting before you stepped away to take care of kids, parents, or whatever. The data is against us. 

In my experience, the data is at least partially right. But before I fill you in on my results, I want to share some tips that proved helpful in my search.

Network! Rule No. 1 of job hunting: reach out to your social circle, friends in your adult sports team, the postman, ANYONE. You never know who might know someone. I was emailing people left and right even before we returned to the States to set up meetings, coffee talks, or online chats to discuss the current status of my field, learn about potential professional opportunities, or just pick up the latest industry gossip.

Know What You Want and Who You Are! So you want to network, but what do you say? In less than 30 seconds, you need to clearly state who you are, your strengths, and the type of job you are looking for, preferably with minimal industry-specific jargon. Think of it as being your own public relations expert who is selling YOU, your skills, and goals. My “PR pitch” highlights my experience in international affairs while stressing my desire for a deputy project manager or chief of staff-type role. Check out Career Sidekick’s great article for specific tips.

Be Active! Spending all your time on the internet searching and applying for jobs is futile at best. I found that when you apply to a job online you are lucky to get an email rejection back. (And for my soapbox moment of the day: if you take the time to complete a job application, the least a company can do is respond saying yes we are interested, or no we aren’t. The lack of politeness on the part of companies to potential employees is beyond awful.) So when you find a job you want to apply to, avoid having it end up in the resume abyss by checking LinkedIn to see if you know anyone at that company—or even have a friend of a friend—who is willing to forward your resume to the hiring manager. Added bonuses for you both: your friend can potentially offer a word of support for your application, and some companies offer credit to employees who help identify talent. I employed this tactic a few times, but admittedly even then only heard back from a recruiter once.

If you follow these steps, you’ll hopefully end up with an offer or two. The big question then is, do you take any job or do you wait for the right one?

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Give me Liberty!

Photo by Fabian Fauth on Unsplash

I recently attended a writing workshop sponsored in New York City – my annual effort at professional development.  It was a great day.  I met other writers, many of whom are also seeking to land an agent, desperate as I am to find someone else to validate their dreams of authorship.  It felt like group therapy, talking to all these other people who are walking the same path, encountering the same hurdles, worrying the same questions on the finer points of query letter etiquette.  

The seminars were really useful too; I jotted down pages of notes on everything from social media management to revision techniques, and, of course, on finding the elusive agent. Speaking of whom, the workshop had several agents on-hand, spending their Saturday leading the seminars and fielding pitch after pitch from hopeful authors (like yours truly) willing to pay $30 for 10 minutes of the agent’s one-on-one time (instead of just querying them for free – more on this in a future post.) 

Three weeks on, I’ve gotten a kind but entirely unhelpful rejection from one of the agents I spoke with, and I’m still waiting in the usual interminable purgatory for the other agent I met.  But while I’ve been waiting, I’ve struck up a number of new online friendships with some of the authors I chatted with at the workshop.  One of these new writer friends began venting about the fact she hadn’t heard back from the agents she queried after ONE WEEK.  

Now, I’m not a fan of the way this whole find-an-agent system works.  It seems overwhelming to the agents and unnecessarily anxiety- and depression-inducing on the author.  But I get that this is the system that we have, a direct result of supply outstripping demand, and that agents are humans too. Having just surrendered a Saturday away from their friends and family to field the same questions they’ve probably heard 100,000 times before, they may need another couple (dozen) of weekends to get around to actually reading what we were all only too happy to send them within minutes of getting their nods.  I mean, everyone deserves a weekend.  

I tried my best to convey this to my new writer friend, but I could feel her resentment dripping off my screen, impervious to my attempts at humanism.  That’s the problem with resentment, though.  It’s a cumulative condition, built a hair’s width at a time, until you’ve got a wretched, snarling beast on your hands. 

Continue reading “Give me Liberty!”